The hard work of becoming anti-racist

Thoughts from @emilyrvballard, image via @wildmysticwoman

"Nothing can save us from the hard work of becoming anti-racist.
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Not yoga classes. Not thoughts and prayers. Not that-not-for-profit-is-sending-my-$25-and-that’s-good. Not shit talking Trump around the water cooler. Not respecting rap.
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This work will force us to let go of people who no longer understand us and don’t want to understand why. It will force us to change our spending habits. It will invite us tell our children about Emmett Till and the wrong thinking that led to his murder and how no, they don’t need to fear for their young lives - not because things have changed, but because they are white and their whiteness protects them. This work will ask us to sit with them while they cry about this new knowledge. And it will ask us, after a few minutes have passed, to gently let them know that the pain they’re feeling right now is necessary so they can understand. And how it’s the tiniest fraction of the agony people of color have lived with for centuries.
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Anything that makes us feel *good* about becoming anti-racist is performative; this shit hurts because it’s supposed to and because it needs to.
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Revolutionary love is boundaried. It is loud and it is clear. Revolutionary love does not settle for what you’re willing to give - it tells you what it expects. Revolutionary love makes you better, but not before it tells you to grow the fuck up and heal your wounds because it’s got shit to do and it’s not waiting around for you. Revolutionary love is the tough love you think you hate and eventually realize you need.
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It’s time for all of us to decide what we stand for. And we must remember: not deciding is a decision.


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